Category Archives: Read Me

JOB GRIT – it’s its own job.

It will take determination and  gumption to get that job.  Read and learn:

For Job Seekers, the Black Hole Persists

By LAUREN WEBER

WSJ
Jun 22, 2015 10:14 am ET

Most of today’s online job applications still enter a black hole.

Frank N. Stein had a stellar resume—he was an Ivy League graduate, with stints as a corporate recruiter at Johnson & Johnson and Russell Reynolds, and his CV was loaded with the keywords needed to float to the top of today’s automated job- applicant software.

He was also not a real person, a fact noted at the bottom of his one-page resume.

Even so, recruiters at only two of the 100 companies where he applied for jobs read far enough to discover that Stein was a fiction designed to “mystery shop” the job-seeker experience. The ruse was created by recruiting consulting firm CareerXroads, according to a report released Monday.

What does that tell Mark Mehler, a founder of CareerXroads?

“Recruiters read the first three paragraphs of a resume,” he said. “That’s all the job seeker is going to get.” And that only counts those whose resumes pass through the automated keyword screening that winnows a set of applications from hundreds to a few dozen.

Every year, Kendall Park, N.J.-based CareerXroads submits a fake resume through the career websites of the companies on Fortune magazine’s 100 Best Companies to Work For list, to assess the recruiting practices of some of the most well- respected employers in the country, including Google Inc., Goldman Sachs Group Inc., and Deloitte LLP.

The results are generally dismal, as they were again this year. Job seekers’ main complaint—that they shoot their applications into a black hole—was confirmed.

Out of the 100 companies, 64 never sent Stein any notification that he was not being considered for the job for which he had applied. Months after submitting his resume, he “was left hanging in the breeze,” said Mehler. Overwhelmingly in job seeker surveys, candidates tell CareerXroads “they just want to know, ‘am I in or out?’ They don’t want to keep chasing and wondering.”

Six of the employers followed up with Stein wanting to schedule interviews, two uncovered the ruse, and 28 eventually notified him that the position had been filled, or at least that he wasn’t in the running.

Worst of all, 28 is the highest number of companies extending that courtesy in the twelve years CareerXroads has conducted the Mystery Job Seeker survey.

There’s no excuse for those oversights, Mehler said, given that those communications can be automated easily in today’s applicant tracking systems, the software that stores job applications.

Most systems have the capacity to do this, but major corporations don’t use those features because they’re scared that opening the lines of communication will lead to lawsuits, too many phone calls to recruiters, and too many questions they can’t answer, he said.

There were bits of good news from Frank N. Stein’s experience. Nearly all employers now send an email acknowledging receipt of a job application. In addition, career websites are easier to navigate than in previous years, and employers have gotten better at streamlining the application so that it takes less time to complete – in most cases, 10 minutes or less.

Another pleasant surprise, according to Mehler: Stein had been unemployed by choice for a year (he had rejected six job offers as poor fits for him, then took a 6-month sabbatical to bicycle across the country), and still received interest from six of the 98 employers who thought he was a real person. “That’s huge,” said Mehler. “It shows that if you write a good resume and have great experience behind you, you can still find a job.”

Internship & Job Sites Links

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Below is a starter list of Internships and Job Sites I found to get you going on your hunt.

I can’t do this for you.   Your teachers can’t.  Your loved ones can’t.

Only you can.

As the wise ones say, “Never try, never know.”

I believe in you.   I would hire you.   The world awaits!   GO!

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Warner Brothers: http://www.warnerbroscareers.com/internships/

Tour Guides and Floaters at Warner: http://www.warnerbroscareers.com/search-jobs/?151452BR

Recommended Temp Agency re Warner: https://www.randstadusa.com

Time Warner (HBO, Turner, Warner): http://www.timewarner.com/careers/areas-of-operation/internships

CW Network: http://www.warnerbroscareers.com/the-cw-network/

DC Entertainment: http://www.warnerbroscareers.com/dc-entertainment/

20th Century Fox: https://www.foxcareers.com/Opportunities/Internships

Sony: http://www.sonypictures.com/corp/careers.html

Comcast: http://jobs.comcast.com/job-123677-comcast-center-internship-program-ccip-marketing-communications-internship-in-philadelphia-pa-campusuniversity

NBC Universal: http://www.nbcunicareers.com/our-businesses/universal-pictures

Universal Auditions for Theme Park: http://www.universalstudioshollywood.com/auditions/upcoming-auditions

NBC Page Program: http://pageprogram.nbcunicareers.com

Read this story re the Page Program: http://leanin.org/stories/shari-raymond/

Dreamworks: http://www.dreamworksanimation.com/careers/

Viacom: http://www.viacomcareers.com/internships.html

Paramount: http://www.paramount.com/inside-studio/studio/internships

Nickelodeon: https://nickanimationstudio.com/nickelodeon-internship-program

Disney: http://profinterns.disneycareers.com/en/default/

Disney ABC: http://datg.disneycareers.com/en/career-areas/students-recent-grads/internships-co-ops/

Pixar: http://www.pixar.com/careers/Intern-Life

CBS: http://cbscorporation.jobs/internships/new-jobs/

Showtime: http://www.onedayonejob.com/jobs/showtime/

Lionsgate: https://www.lionsgate.com/corporate/careers/

Netflix: https://jobs.netflix.com

Hulu: http://www.hulu.com/jobs/positions

Amazon Studios: https://www.amazon.jobs/en/teams/amazon-studios.63

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/careers/university/

Starz: https://www.starz.com/internships/index.html

AMC Networks: http://www.amcnetworks.com/career

VICE: http://www.vice.com/jobs

WGN: http://wgntv.com/2012/12/02/entertainment-internship/

WGN America: https://www.entertainmentcareers.net/c-WGN-America-jobs/

MGM: http://www.mgm.com/#/about/careers

Marvel: http://marvel.com/corporate/interns

Comedy Central: http://www.vault.com/internship_program/television/comedy-central/overview

CAA: https://caacareers.silkroad.com/caacareers/Internships-Opportunities.html

ICM: http://www.vault.com/internship_program/film/international-creative-management/overview

UTA: http://www.vault.com/internship_program/media-and-entertainment/united-talent-agency/overview

William Morris Endeavor: http://www.wmeentertainment.com

Gersh Agency: http://www.gershagency.com

APA: http://www.apa-agency.com

Variety: http://variety.com/2004/biz/news/internships-1117902602/

 

Internship  Sample Letters – read, think, adapt!

https://www.mindsumo.com/cover_letters/CBS-Interactive-/Internship/58

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/5-steps-to-a-killer-cover-letter/

PLEASE ADD LINKS HERE YOU FIND TO SHARE WITH FELLOW ALUMS!

Can LinkedIn + You = A Career?

All of you who met with me should have heard my story of how my friend who is the head of HR at Warner Brothers stressed the importance of having a strong LinkedIn presence and the story shared here from today’s WSJ makes this point better than I ever could.
Read, implement, try and succeed!

Ignoring LinkedIn Is Hurting Your Career

With its refreshed app and some tricks, it’s time to make the uncoolest professional network part of your social-media routine

At Social Media High, Facebook is the all-star quarterback, Twitter is the school paper’s editor in chief and Snapchat is the mysterious, Harley-riding transfer student. That makes LinkedIn the nerd who skips prom for the mathlympics.

Yet, like in every great John Hughes movie, the underdog actually belongs in the in-crowd.

Admit it. Your most frequent interaction with the world’s uncoolest network is deleting those “Join my network” emails. You’re not alone: 61% of LinkedIn users visit the site no more than every few weeks, according to Pew Research Center.

I was the same, avoiding LinkedIn’s baffling design and incessant nagging. But a few weeks ago, when I decided to give it a real varsity tryout, I realized LinkedIn deserves a place on my phone’s home screen. I now check it a couple of times a week to find out what’s happening in my industry. Use it right and you’ll get ideas on how to improve your business, find new leads—and maybe land a job you didn’t even know you wanted.

What’s changed? LinkedIn has drastically improved its iOS and Android apps over the past few months, with even more iPhone app changes arriving just this week. With some tricks and assistance from LinkedIn pros, I’ve been able to zero in on the most important features within the overwhelming service. Don’t get me wrong: Parts of it are still inexcusably terrible. But what other social network allows you to connect with people in a professional way?  Continue reading Can LinkedIn + You = A Career?

Coming Soon To A “Screen” Near You!

From Nickelodeons to Screening Room, how we watch what we watch has been and will be a key element of the cinematic experience.

I am withholding my opinion on these following stories until I hear from you, dear students and graduates, as it is YOUR tomorrow that will be most impacted by this “breakthrough” in film distribution and exhibition.

It is your “stories” that are going to be impacted by this technology.

Read, think, debate, and share.

Sean Parker stood in front of a whiteboard at Napster’s dingy offices in San Mateo, Calif., and mapped out a hoped-for future for the besieged music file-sharing service.

It was late at night, and amid the detritus of discarded pizza boxes, a group of Red Bull-guzzling employees had assembled to hear the Napster co-founder’s plan to begin paying fees to artists and record labels, recalls filmmaker Alex Winter, whose documentary “Downloaded” covers the rise and fall of Napster.

“This was an impassioned explanation of why Napster at its heart was not a ‘stealing business,'” Winter said of the 1999 meeting. “He made it clear that if they couldn’t do licensing deals with the labels, they’d have to close down.”

Continue reading Coming Soon To A “Screen” Near You!

So, you can be the new Coen Brothers…

The other day I had the pleasure of meeting Andric L. Queen-Booker, Class of 2012 – a wonderfully talented and smart young man – and he mentioned that he enjoyed the HBO series, Togetherness, and was a big fan of the Duplass brothers.  As am I.  And my wife.  This is a win-win as it means she enjoys watching a show I enjoying watching, and when you’re in your 4th decade together, and TV wasteland time is limited, that’s a HUGE deal.

When I asked Andric why he liked the brothers, and Togetherness, he said: “It’s real. Truthful.”

So it is.  HBO worth paying for.

Imagine my surprise when the LA Weekly (a paper like the New Times for all my AZ friends) published today – did a wonderful story on the Duplass brothers that is perfectly timed to share with you.

Read this.

I did, twice.  And their story has ME pumped to do more, my way, now.

Go out there and be the STORYTELLER (actor, producer, director, writer, executive, agent, human being) that you want to be!

How the Duplass Brothers Changed Hollywood by Refusing to Change at All

MONDAY, MARCH 21, 2016 AT 6:30 A.M.

by Gwynedd Stuart

It’s an irresistibly warm weekday in late January, and Jay and Mark Duplass are in their office at Sunset Gower Studios in Hollywood preparing to write the third season of their HBO series, Togetherness. I note the timing because it happens to be Sundance week, and they’re here rather than there (I note the weather because, goddamn, we’re lucky) — and it’s the rare year they don’t have a pony to show. Last year, Sean S. Baker’s iPhone-filmed, Hollywood-set dramedy Tangerine, which the Duplasses executive produced, was one of the festival’s most talked-about films. They also executive produced Melissa Rauch’s The Bronze, another 2015 Sundance selection.

And all of 11 years ago, their first full-length feature, the low-budget relationship drama–slash–road-trip comedy The Puffy Chair, was among the festival’s breakout hits, winning the Audience Choice Award and making their mutual inclusion in conversations about young filmmakers-to-watch almost instantaneous. They were among a handful of auteurs whose work was being lumped together to constitute what was called the “mumblecore” movement. Major record labels were fixating on all things indie rock, and major film studios were fixating on quiet, quirky dramas being made for $15,000 rather than $15 million.

After the 2005 fest, Mark and his now-wife, director-actress Katie Aselton, packed up and moved from New York to L.A.; Jay headed West that December. With the benefit of hindsight, it’s safe to say these were good decisions. Continue reading So, you can be the new Coen Brothers…

Adventures in VR Part 3

2020 Vision: Experts Predict the Future of Virtual Reality

jesse-schell-vision-3

The inaugural Unity Vision VR/AR Summit just wrapped up, where 1,400 Unity developers converged on Hollywood to learn from some of the legends of virtual reality. During the event, six of these VR veterans took the stage to share their predictions for the state of virtual reality in the year 2020.

1. VR will be the new internet.

This from Mike Capps, former President of Epic Games and current advisor for the Vision Summit. He earned a PHD in virtual reality before Keanu Reeves’ performance as Johnny Mnemonic ruined VR’s early chances of survival, creating unmanageable expectations, and breaking his tender heart.

Johnny Mnemonic VR

But now he’s back, arguing that VR is going away once again. But not the tech. Not the content. He argues that ‘virtual reality’ isn’t even the phrase we’ll use to describe the medium in 2020 because it will be so much bigger than that.

2. You will spend your flights in virtual reality.

Instead of passing out cheap ear buds, Capps believes that by 2020, airlines will provide virtual in-flight entertainment systems for all passengers.

Continue reading Adventures in VR Part 3

Adventures in VR Part 2

From the WSJ:

Virtual-Reality Movies: Get Ready for the VR Revolution

VR headsets, like the Oculus Rift, can immerse you in the action as never before. Here’s how the technology is changing Hollywood—and 7 must-see virtual-reality experiences to try now…

By

ERICH SCHWARTZEL

WHETHER YOU’RE AN avid cinephile or you haven’t been to a movie theater since enduring “Attack of the Clones,” one thing is certain: Over the next few years, virtual reality will completely reboot your relationship to the moving image. That’s because the once-geeks-only technology, known as VR for short, is becoming shockingly good at making you feel as though you’re in the midst of the action—cycling through the air with E.T. or spinning atop an alp with an excitable Fraulein Maria—rather than observing from afar.

We hear your objections: “There’s absolutely no way I’m going to wear one of those dorky-looking headsets. I won’t even be caught dead in 3-D glasses.” Even if you acknowledge that the motion-tracking technology VR systems employ is pretty cool, allowing users to look freely around a 360-degree environment, you’re perfectly content with real reality, thank you very much.

Behind the scenes, however, VR is rewriting the script for Hollywood. VR works are already popping up at prominent film festivals like Sundance and next month’s Tribeca Film Festival (where screenings take place in small rooms rather than large theaters). A-list directors such as Ridley Scott and Steven Spielberg are working on top-secret VR projects. Even “Airplane!” director Jerry Zucker, not usually associated with the cutting edge, is developing an immersive comedy.

Viewing VR is starkly different than watching a traditional film: With conventional movies, the director dictates your focus of attention. An aerial view cuts to a medium shot cuts to a close up—giving you no say in what you see. But virtual reality puts you in charge. The headset allows you to observe any aspect of a setting and, in some cases, even affect the way the story unfolds depending on where you look.  Continue reading Adventures in VR Part 2

Adventures in VR Part 1

I have been waiting to find a good combination of stories on VR and the opportunities this new tech offers storytellers, and here are the best of the best online now.  Well worth your time to read and learn…

Goldman Sachs Has Four Charts Showing the Huge Potential in Virtual and Augmented Reality

Virtual reality started making fresh headlines in 2014, when Facebook made a $2 billion acquisition of Oculus VR. Now Google Inc. has ramped up its “VR” game by focusing Clay Bavor, vice president of product management, solely on virtual reality.

As Wall Street tries to calculate the possible impact on a number of industries, Goldman Sachs Group has put forth some charts laying out its assumptions for what it believes will be an $80 billion market by 2025.

Here’s what caught our eye.

1. Slower adoption, big potential

The first chart looks at how the virtual reality and augmented reality business will fare when compared to the adoption process undergone with smartphones and tablets. Goldman believes it will take a while longer to see such adoption, but “as the technology advances, price points decline, and an entire new marketplace of applications (both business and consumer) hit the market, we believe VR/AR has the potential to spawn a multibillion-dollar industry, and possibly be as game changing as the advent of the PC,” the analysts noted.

Continue reading Adventures in VR Part 1

SO BAD IT’S GOOD – TV’s Money Game

“Breaking Bad” is a series I suspect we all watched.  As such I found this article to be an excellent one offering a good hard look at the numbers, the hows, the whys and the wherefores of a TV Series, and how a “HIT” can change the lives of everyone, especially the network and studio, “lucky” enough to “own” it.

If you only read one thing I post on TV, this would be a top choice.

HB

The Economics of a Hit TV Show

Photo Credit:  Lewis Jacobs / AMC

Ten million Americans can recall where they were the night of September 29th, 2013. They were watching the series finale of Breaking Bad. And they were watching it on AMC, a cable channel that once cut its teeth airing reruns of black-and-white movies.

The suits at the network were prepared. Like Walter White, the show’s ruthlessly efficient meth dealer, they knew they had a quality product on their hands. And they charged their customers accordingly. AMC extended the runtime of the last two episodes from 44 to 54 minutes – 75 minutes apiece with commercials – and raised its advertising rates to as much as $400,000 per 30-second spot. The 21 minutes of commercial airtime in “Felina,” the show’s final episode, may have earned the network $7-8 million in advertising revenue.

But keeping Breaking Bad on the air was a big investment. Shooting the show cost about $3 million per episode in 2010, and $3.5 million per episode in its final season. The show’s last 16 episodes cost approximately $56 million to produce.

And finding a hit like Breaking Bad – or even finding a viable show to put on the air in the first place – often costs networks hundreds of millions of dollars each year in development costs and pricey, failed pilot projects.

Things could get even more expensive. Breaking Bad uberfan Jeffrey Katzenberg, co-founder of Dreamworks, reportedly offered to pay $25 million per episode to produce three more episodes. That’s a total of $75 million, at an average of $568,000 per minuteof final air length. Continue reading SO BAD IT’S GOOD – TV’s Money Game

“No Money No Honey”

The above quote was first said to me by a Sushi Chef who had practically become a member of my family (after all, I was supporting him, his wife and kids with all the Omakase dinners I devoured), and it gets right to the heart of a point we talked about – that you have to make a living  in order to survive, and the more money the better the life you and your future loved ones will count on and enjoy.

This article is geared toward the business side of the industry, and provides a “tasty” snapshot of what you can make starting out in your first, post, non-struggling-assistant position on a desk at an agency or network or studio, and details income figures offering you plenty to incentives to work hard and harder if this career appeals to you as the rewards are ample and exciting.

Once again, this is from Producer Gavin Palone, and you are going to want to read past the big shot salaries and pay special attention to the “entry level” salaries of Rookie Development Executives and Baby Agents:

Polone: So How Much Do Hollywood Players Make?

By 

There are two topics in which we are all endlessly interested: sex and money. Specifically, how much of both other people are getting and from whom. While we get to hear quite a lot about these topics when it comes to celebrities, I’m far more interested in hearing about how much the more regular people with whom I regularly interact are getting — well, not so much the sex part, but certainly how much money they’re making. I don’t feel competitive with Adam Sandler, but there is certainly a part of me that wants to gauge myself against my peers, and while it is easy to gain some estimate of what Mr. Sandler makes in a year by doing a quick Google search, there isn’t much said about the earnings of the executives, attorneys, and agents whom I talk to all day long. So, to satisfy my curiosity, I did an unscientific survey of about ten top lawyers, agents, and executives who would have direct knowledge of compensation at their own firms, as well as many others. From these interviews, I was able to estimate compensation ranges for each job category. (I gave more weight to information that came from those who had more experience with specific deals: agents talking about what people are paid at their agency; lawyers explaining deals they’ve negotiated on behalf of studio executives, etc.) Here is my guide to Hollywood’s one percent: Except where noted, the following are “all-in” numbers, including salary, bonus, and stock awards. Continue reading “No Money No Honey”